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Review of Section 482 of the Taxes Consolidation Act, 1997

Mon, 13 Feb 2017 16:00:00 GMT

Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage, Regional, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs, has announced that her Department is carrying out a review of Section 482 of the Taxes Consolidation Act, 1997.  The review is one of the actions proposed in An Action Plan for the Sustainable Future of the Irish Historic House in Private Ownership launched by the Minister in 2015.

Section 482 of the Taxes Consolidation Act, 1997, aims to help with the preservation of our built heritage by giving tax relief to the owners or occupiers of significant buildings or gardens to maintain, repair and restore such properties.  A condition of the scheme is that the property is required to be open to the public for a minimum number of days each year or is in use as a registered guesthouse.

The review is being undertaken by the Department of Arts, Heritage, Regional, Rural and Gaeltacht Affair and the Department of Finance with support from the Revenue Commissioners.  Interested parties are invited to make submissions by the closing date of 24th March 2017.

Download the Review of Section 482 Relief – Department of Arts, Heritage, Regional, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs and Department of Finance Consultation Paper here: Review of Section 482 Relief Consultation Paper

  Section 482 Review

Built Heritage Investment Scheme and Structures at Risk Fund

Wed, 01 Feb 2017 00:05:00 GMT
Built Heritage Investment Scheme and Structures at Risk Fund  

The Built Heritage Investment Scheme (BHIS) and Structures at Risk Fund (SRF) are open for applications from the 1st February 2017.

  • Applications can only be made via your local authority
  • The last day for applications for both schemes is the 28th February 2017
  • Application forms and further details can be found on your local authority website
  • All queries about the schemes should be directed to your local authority, i.e. the Architectural Conservation Officer or other officer in the local authority dealing with the schemes

The Built Heritage Investment Scheme (BHIS) is intended for the repair and conservation of structures protected under the Planning and Development Act 2000 (as amended).  The scheme aims to support a significant number of labour-intensive, small-scale conservation projects across the country and to support the employment of skilled and experienced conservation professionals, craftspeople and tradespersons in the repair of the historic built environment.  The scheme for 2017 is open for applications throughout the month of February.  Details and application forms are available from your local authority.

The Structures at Risk Fund (SRF) helps with conservation works to heritage structures, in private and public ownership, protected under the Planning and Development Act 2000 (as amended) and deemed to be at significant risk of deterioration.  The fund is again administered through the local authorities and seeks to encourage the regeneration and reuse of heritage properties and give support to owners/occupiers in their long-term commitment to securing the future of an architectural heritage which might otherwise be lost.  The fund for 2017 is open for applications throughout the month of February.  Details and application forms are available from your local authority.

NOTE: In the context of a particular building, especially one on the Record of Protected Structures, the best advice for the owner is to contact the Architectural Conservation Officer at the local authority who will be able to advise on the various types of funding available to assist with the building.

Issue with Historic Environment Viewer

Mon, 23 Jan 2017 00:05:00 GMT
This is to notify users of the Historic Environment Viewer that following an upgrade by Google of their Chrome browser software at the beginning of this year certain functionality on the Historic Environment Viewer is not responsive, e.g. search by County/Townland.  The site is working as normal in Edge, Firefox and Internet Explorer.  However, Google Chrome's latest updates have prevented the search buttons from working as expected.  This anomaly has been reported to our service provider. If the browser choice is not an option for users, our service provider has advised that in Chrome it is possible to navigate to the "Search" button using the TAB keyboard key and then hitting the Enter keyboard key to execute the query.  

Historic Environment Viewer Issue 01

Open Historic Environment Viewer

Historic Environment Viewer Issue 02

Enter eight digit Registration Number, e.g. 15702503

Hit Tab key followed by Enter key to go to selected record

Historic Environment Viewer Issue 03

Conserving Your Dublin Period House Spring Course 2017

Wed, 18 Jan 2017 00:05:00 GMT

The Irish Georgian Society and Dublin City Council have assembled a team of conservation experts to present a series of talks on the history and significance of Dublin's period houses and practical advice on their conservation.  Attendance at the talks will prove invaluable for owners of all periods and types of houses, from the modest Edwardian artisan dwelling to the substantial red bricks of the Victorian suburbs and the fine townhouses of our Georgian city squares, providing an A to Z for their care and conservation.

The talks, which will commence on Tuesday 21st February 2017, and continue for 12 weeks, will take place from 1pm to 2pm, in the Helen Roe Theatre, RSAI, 63 Merrion Square, Dublin 2.  It is possible to attend one, all or as many of the talks as you wish.  The talks are priced at €15 each, payable at the door, or booked in advance at a reduced rate of €125 for all twelve talks.  Complementary to the Tuesday talks will be a Saturday morning walking tour, at an additional cost of €15.

The Conserving your Dublin Period House course is an action of the Dublin City Heritage Plan and fulfils the City Council's conservation policy to provide architectural advice to homeowners.  It is also an action of the Irish Georgian Society's Conservation Education Programme.

Click here to download the full programme and booking form:  Conserving Your Dublin Period House Spring Course 2017 Brochure

  Conserving Your Dublin Period House 2017

Funded Research Projects Parade, Brussels, 20th-21st February 2017

Tue, 17 Jan 2017 00:05:00 GMT
Funded Research Projects Parade  

The Funded Research Projects Parade is an event being organised by the Joint Programming Initiative on Cultural Heritage in order to put into perspective and present results of projects granted through the two joint calls.  The Parade is intended to give a fresh impetus to research applied to Cultural Heritage by exploiting and foreseeing impact of most recent research results under the Joint Programming Initiative Cultural Heritage.

The Parade will be supported by an interactive element focusing on four thematic themes:

  1. New technologies for conservation and protection of Cultural Heritage
  2. Living traditions for bottom up local development
  3. New models for cultural heritage management
  4. Rethinking urban spaces and landscapes as cultural heritage assets

The Parade will also offer an opportunity to forge new institutional relationships and strengthen existing ones, in view of future collaborations.

The Parade takes place at the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage (KIKIRPA), Parc du Cinquantenaire 1 B-1000, Brussels, on Monday 20th and Tuesday 21st February 2017.  Click here to download the full programme:  Funded Research Projects Parade Programme

Fourth Issue of "Heritage Ireland" now available

Thu, 21 Jul 2016 00:06:00 IST

Heritage Ireland Issue 4 (Summer 2016)

The fourth issue of "Heritage Ireland" is now available.  A collaboration between the Office of Public Works (OPW) and the Department of Arts, Heritage, Regional, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs (DAHRRGA), "Heritage Ireland" brings you features and news on Ireland's cultural institutions and heritage sites.

Highlights of the fourth issue of "Heritage Ireland" include the Cistercian Tintern Abbey at Saltmills, County Wexford, with a brief article on the nearby Colclough Walled Garden which has been undergoing restoration since 2010; the history of the General Post Office, Dublin, the symbol of the 1916 Rising; and the beautiful Ilnacullin on Garinish Island, County Cork, designed by Harold Ainsworth Peto (1854-1913).

This year's National Heritage Week takes place from the 20th to the 28th of August and over 1,800 heritage events are being organised.  "Heritage Ireland" takes a look at some of the events being held at Office of Public Works sites across the country during National Heritage Week.

Click here to download your copy of the fourth issue of "Heritage Ireland"

Minister Humphreys Announces €900,000 in funding for 57 Heritage Projects

Thu, 02 Jun 2016 00:05:00 IST

Structures at Risk Fund 2016

 

Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, has announced funding of €904,530 to 57 heritage projects under the Structures at Risk Fund (SRF) for 2016.  The scheme provides funding for protected structures in private and public ownership.  The funding being provided ranges from €4,000 per project to over €26,000 per project.

The Minister said:

"This scheme was first introduced in 2011, and since then it has made an invaluable contribution to the preservation and protection of our built heritage.  This year, 57 projects across 27 local authority areas will benefit from direct funding from my Department.  Heritage projects in every region across the country are set to benefit under this scheme.

"Support for our built heritage is vital not only for the safekeeping of Ireland's architectural heritage, it also helps to support employment in the conservation and construction industries.  Investing in our heritage will also play a very important role in rural regeneration, which of course will be a priority area in my new expanded portfolio.

"This year, historic houses were eligible to apply for funding under the scheme.  I launched the Action Plan for the Sustainable Future of the Irish Historic House at the end of last year, which set out a roadmap of actions, including the broadening of funding sources, for this specific area of Ireland's architectural heritage.

"Improving the quality and aesthetics of historic structures can add to a community's sense of pride and contributes hugely to the revitalisation of rural towns and villages.  Heritage buildings are a very important part of our cultural landscape, and as the economy continues to improve, I hope to be in a position to support the heritage sector to the benefit of communities across the country".

The Structures at Risk Fund provides funding for works to safeguard structures, in private and public ownership, protected under the Planning and Development Act 2000, as amended, and, in certain cases, works to structures within Architectural Conservation Areas.  Typical works to be funded under the scheme include roof repairs, structural consolidation and measures to ensure weather tightness.

The list of projects awarded funding for 2016 is available here:  Structures at Risk Fund 2016 Projects

341 Projects Benefit From Built Heritage Investment Scheme 2016

Fri, 29 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT

Built Heritage Investment Scheme 2016 02

Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, has announced that 341 projects across Ireland will share in a €2 million investment package as part of the Built Heritage Investment Scheme 2016.

The funding will allow for the conservation and repair of protected structures across the country, the scheme following the same model as the Built Heritage Jobs Leverage Scheme which proved to be very successful in 2014.  It is expected that the Built Heritage Investment Scheme 2016 will leverage an additional €7 million in private funds and will generate significant employment in the conservation and construction industries.

Speaking about the Built Heritage Investment Scheme 2016, Minister Humphreys said:

"This investment scheme will support heritage buildings and jobs in the conservation sector right across the country.  The €2 million investment will leverage an additional €7 million in private sector funds and will stimulate labour intensive projects nationwide.

"Ireland's heritage buildings and protected structures are a vital part of the infrastructure of our villages, towns, and cities including our national economy.  The economic recovery is allowing for increased investment in our heritage assets.  As this scheme illustrates, investing in our built heritage is not just good for the individual properties concerned, but can also provide a real boost to job creation in the construction, conservation and tourism sectors. 

"A wide range of properties will benefit, including country houses and townhouses, churches, railway stations, thatched houses and other protected structures. 

"I would like to acknowledge the contribution of the local authorities in embracing this scheme, which will have a positive impact on protected structures across the country.  I am also delighted by the response of private owners and their willingness to release substantial private matching funds and invest in our built heritage."

Of the 341 projects considered, the majority were for places of worship and residential use.  The main type of works for which funding was sought was for roof repairs and for the restoration of external joinery.  A number of applications were for the re-thatching of buildings of special interest.

Notable protected structures among the applications were the Church of Ireland churches in Collon, County Louth; Westport, County Mayo; Lismore, County Waterford, and the cathedral in Limerick City.  Some of our finest country houses have also been provided funding including Borris House, County Carlow; Bantry House, County Cork; and Stradbally Hall, County Laois.  Important Georgian townhouses include 63 Merrion Square, Dublin, and 5 John's Square North, Limerick.  Other important structures include the former railway station at Glaslough, County Monaghan.

Click here to download the full list of successful projects: Built Heritage Investment Scheme 2016 Projects

Historic Environment Viewer now available

Thu, 17 Dec 2015 15:00:00 GMT

Historic Environment Viewer 01 - Home Page

Historic Environment Viewer 02

Historic Environment Viewer 03 - Partry Points

Historic Environment Viewer 04 - Partry NIAH Records

Historic Environment Viewer 05 - Partry NMS Records

Historic Environment Viewer with points, NIAH records and NMS records for Partry, County Mayo

 

The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage (NIAH) would like to bring to your attention that the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht has just deployed a new public map viewer.  The viewer, called the Historic Environment Viewer, is capable of being accessed on all browsers and platforms, including smartphones.  The viewer has been developed to enhance the user's experience by facilitating access to the records of the NIAH as well as those of the National Monuments Service (NMS), thus providing a seamless one-stop point of access to both datasets.

As with the old viewer, the NIAH records will continue to be shown on the map as blue points and the NMS records as red points.  The viewer has the same functionality, i.e. download, search, &c.

As this is a new viewer, it is to be expected that there may be some bugs and glitches, and we ask that you bear with us while these are resolved.

The Historic Environment Viewer can be accessed by clicking on the following link: http://webgis.buildingsofireland.ie/HistoricEnvironment/

Minister Aodhán Ó Ríordáin launches NIAH Survey of Dublin North City

Wed, 09 Dec 2015 09:00:00 GMT

Aodhán Ó Ríordáin TD, Minister of State for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, launched the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage survey of Dublin North City at the Hugh Lane Gallery, Parnell Square, Dublin, on Tuesday 8th December 2015.  The survey, which is available online, is accompanied by an illustrated book, An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of Dublin North City, the thirty-third to be published in the series.  The Introduction is the first of four planned for the city.

Arising from the survey, the Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht has recommended to Dublin City Council that 2,206 structures of architectural heritage significance be included on their Record of Protected Structures, an increase of 845 on their existing RPS.  Minister Ó Ríordáin remarked: "I hope that the results of the survey will reinforce pride in our built heritage and ensure that it will be cherished for this and future generations".

The survey and Introduction together paint a portrait of that part of the city enclosed by the Liffey, the Royal Canal, Phoenix Park and Dublin Bay.  A wide range of structures is covered including the Custom House, a neo-Classical masterpiece of international significance; Busáras, a fine example of twentieth-century architecture; and the few surviving Victorian post boxes.

Minister Ó Ríordáin emphasised the important role of the survey as a tool for assisting Dublin City Council in the future protection of the architectural heritage of the city.  He added: "If historic buildings are to survive as our legacy to the future, they will have to be adapted to cater for the changing needs of their occupants.  The challenge is to manage change without sacrificing the intrinsic character of the building".

Councillor Ciarán Cuffe, representing the Lord Mayor, commented: "This survey is a significant milestone in recognising the importance of the built heritage of Dublin City.  It is a hugely valuable resource, and is particularly relevant on the eve of the centenary of the Easter Rising.  In addition, the survey will assist us in supporting the Living City Initiative to bring new life to older buildings in the city".

Click here to view the NIAH Dublin North City survey.  Click here for information on the An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of Dublin North City book.

 

Dublin North City Launch 01

Dublin North City Launch 02

Aodhán Ó Ríordáin TD, Minister of State for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht; Dr. Barbara Dawson, Director, Hugh Lane Gallery; and Councillor Ciarán Cuffe, Dublin City Council, at the launch of the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage survey of Dublin North City at the Hugh Lane Gallery, Parnell Square, Dublin

Dublin North City Launch 03 

An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of Dublin North City now available

Tue, 08 Dec 2015 16:00:00 GMT
Dublin North City Introduction  

The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage has recently published An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of Dublin North City, the thirty-third in a series showcasing the Architectural Heritage of Ireland.

The Introduction is the first of four planned for Dublin and, together with the accompanying survey, is a portrait of that part of the city enclosed by the Liffey, the Royal Canal, Phoenix Park and Dublin Bay – otherwise known as "the northside".

Dublin in 1610 was little more than a small town when John Speed made his famous map, the earliest surviving map of the city.  Over the next two hundred years, however, it was to become the sixth largest city in Europe, larger than Berlin, Madrid or Rome.  Perhaps the most significant planning decision in the seventeenth century was that the city should face the river, thereby creating the Liffey quays and contributing hugely to its character.  The work of the Wide Street Commissioners, established in 1757 and one of the first such bodies in the world, gave Dublin its recognisable plan.

Because of its historical poverty, the north inner city is sometimes seen as architecturally inferior to the south inner city.  For instance, commentators often focus on Fitzwilliam Square and Merrion Square, ignoring the comparable quality of Henrietta Street, North Great George's Street, Mountjoy Square and Parnell Square.  "The Northside" also contains many of the city's architectural highlights – the Custom House; the GPO; the Four Courts; fine churches of all denominations; grand houses; and public buildings.  The canals and railways which frame the north city have also left a legacy of fine architecture while Michael Scott's Busarás, completed in 1953, marked the arrival of full-blown International Modernism in Ireland.

An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of Dublin North City showcases the city's architectural heritage from the medieval period up to the present day.  Many of the buildings will be familiar, but some are rarely seen by the public, including the wonderful Baroque interior of the chapel of the Rotunda Hospital and the galleried interior of the old Broadstone Railway Station.

An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of Dublin North City, featuring a text by Merlo Kelly and photography by Stephen Farrell, is available in all good bookshops and online at www.wordwellbooks.com

Minister Humphreys publishes Action Plan for Historic Houses

Tue, 01 Dec 2015 00:05:00 GMT

Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, launched An Action Plan for the Sustainable Future of the Irish Historic House in Private Ownership at Hilton Park, County Monaghan, on Monday 30th November 2015.  The Action Plan contains nine actions aimed at securing these historic houses on a sustainable footing into the future.

The Action Plan focuses on ways to strengthen links with local communities; the development of visitor programmes; boosting marketing and tourism opportunities; and improving links between historic houses and the education sector.

The Action Plan is the result of the work of the Irish Historic Houses Committee, which the Minister established in February of this year.  The Committee included representatives from relevant Government Departments, the Irish Historic Houses Association, Fáilte Ireland, relevant non-governmental organisations, and a number of individual historic house owners.

Speaking at the launch Minister Humphreys said:

"My Department estimates that there are up to 2,000 historic houses across the country.  These properties are not just historically significant, they are also important assets to local communities which can help to drive tourism and economic activity.

"Due to the age and scale of these properties, owners and custodians face huge challenges meeting their upkeep.  While it is not realistic or prudent for the Government to provide large amounts of financial support, I believe we must consider ways to better support historic houses so we can secure their viability into the future.

"This Action Plan sets out a number of practical steps which will help to safeguard the future of historic houses.  Four of the nine actions contained in the Action Plan will now be treated as a priority.

  • The development of an Historic House-Living Museum programme for private houses open to the public to help attract more visitors and tell the stories of these houses
  • The development of a specific visitor promotional programme
  • The establishment of a building conservation advisory service for owners of historic houses to help advise them on the maintenance and upkeep of their properties
  • A review, in collaboration with the Department of Finance, of Section 482 of the Taxes Consolidated Act, 1997

"It is clear that without action, these heritage properties will fall into decline.  This Action Plan should be seen as a first step.  My Department will now set about implementing the priority actions and will work with local authorities, property owners and other agencies to provide better support and advice for historic houses across the country".

Susan Kellett, Chairperson of the Irish Historic Houses Association, said:

"I would like to thank the Minister for this welcome and far sighted initiative to assist and support the private owners of historic houses.  We now all have the task of ensuring that the Action Plan delivers for owners, their houses, for local communities and indeed for the country".

Download An Action Plan for the Sustainable Future of the Irish Historic House in Private Ownership here: An Action Plan for the Sustainable Future of the Irish Historic House in Private

 

An Action Plan for the Sustainable Future of the Irish Historic House in Private

An Action Plan Launch 01

Johnny Madden, Hilton Park, County Monaghan; Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht; Susan Kellett, Enniscoe House, County Mayo, Chairperson of the Irish Historic Houses Association, at the launch of An Action Plan for the Sustainable Future of the Irish Historic House in Private Ownership

An Action Plan Launch 02

Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht; Roderick and Helena Perceval Temple Hill, County Sligo, at the launch of An Action Plan for the Sustainable Future of the Irish Historic House in Private Ownership

Second issue of "Heritage Ireland" now available

Fri, 26 Jun 2015 00:05:00 IST

The second issue of "Heritage Ireland" is now available.  A collaboration between the Office of Public Works and the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, "Heritage Ireland" brings you features and news on Ireland's cultural institutions and heritage sites.

Included in the second issue of "Heritage Ireland" are short articles by some of the people who care for these sites: the guides who help visitors to enjoy what they have on offer; the archaeologists who have studied their mysteries for years; and the architects who work on their conservation and restoration.

Highlights of the second issue of "Heritage Ireland" include the Secret Garden at Fota House, County Cork; the architectural heritage of County Donegal including Newmills Corn and Flax Mills; the Wellington Testimonial at Phoenix Park, Dublin; and the newly refurbished Derrynane House in County Kerry.

This year's National Heritage Week takes place at the end of August and over 1,800 heritage events are being organised.  "Heritage Ireland" showcases a number of the sites which will be opening their doors to the public during National Heritage Week.

Click here to download your copy of the second issue of issue of "Heritage Ireland": Heritage Ireland Issue 2 (Summer 2015)
  Heritage Ireland E-zine Summer 2015

Minister Humphreys launches National Landscape Strategy for Ireland 2015-2025

Tue, 26 May 2015 15:30:00 IST
National Landscape Strategy for Ireland 2015-2025  

Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, has launched the National Landscape Strategy (NLS) for Ireland 2015-2025.  The NLS will ensure compliance with the European Landscape Convention (ELC) and will provide a high level policy framework to achieve balance between the management, planning and protection of Ireland's landscape.

Speaking at the launch in Dublin Castle, Minister Humphreys said:

"When we think of landscapes, we generally think of places of rural, scenic beauty.  But our landscapes are much more than that; they are dynamic environments, the results of the interaction between natural and human factors.

"Our landscape goes beyond the countryside; it covers urban and rural areas, encompassing land, inland waters, coastal and marine areas.  This includes every-day and degraded landscapes, as well as those considered to be exceptional.  Crucially, our landscapes have a bearing on our quality of life and deserve attention in landscape policy.

"Our landscape can and will continue to accommodate multiple uses, and be appreciated in many different ways.  However to have a sustainable society, environment and economy, we need to both embrace change and to manage our important landscape in an integrated and planned way.

"Using the parameters of the European Landscape Convention, our challenge now is achieving a balance between our social, cultural, economic and environmental needs for our various landscapes.  The National Landscape Strategy is a first step in confronting this challenge.

"The strategy contains six core objectives which focus on developing appropriate landscape policies dealing with education, awareness and strengthening public participation.  The core objective is to allow for the sustainable management of 'change', rather than 'freezing' the landscape at a particular point in time.  This strategy will help us to anticipate and manage challenges between present and emerging land uses".

Download the National Landscape Strategy for Ireland 2015-2025 here: National Landscape Strategy for Ireland 2015-2025

Great Lighthouses of Ireland

Wed, 20 May 2015 18:00:00 IST
Great Lighthouses of Ireland  

"A new experience to take your breath away".  That is the promise from Great Lighthouses of Ireland, an EU-funded tourism initiative recently launched by Pascal Donohoe TD, Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport, and the Commissioners of Irish Lights.

Featuring twelve lighthouses in stunning coastal locations, Great Lighthouses of Ireland will offer unforgettable experiences and create an appreciation of the role of lighthouses, past and present, in the maritime and seafaring story of Ireland.

The Great Lighthouses of Ireland are:

Saint John's Point, County Donegal;

Fanad Head, County Donegal;

Rathlin West Light Seabird Centre, County Antrim;

Black Head, County Antrim;

Saint John's Point, County Down;

Wicklow Head, County Wicklow;

Hook Head, County Wexford;

Ballycotton, County Cork;

Galley Head, County Cork;

Valentia Island, County Kerry;

Loop Head, County Clare;

Clare Island, County Mayo.

With a range of services including accommodation, guided tours and visitor centres, visitors from home and abroad will have the chance to explore the distinct experiences offered by the twelve lighthouses, each one reflecting its own history and heritage, nature and environment, people and place, with aspects to appeal to people of all ages and interests.

Yvonne Shields, Chief Executive of the Commissioners of Irish Lights, said:

"Irish Lights has been operating around the coast – north and south – for nearly two hundred and fifty years.  Advances in technology and automation means that we no longer need as much of the old physical infrastructure at lighthouses to operate our aids to navigation today.  So, as part of a new strategy, we are developing a range of new uses for our infrastructure and tourism is an obvious option for some of our lighthouses.  The Great Lighthouses of Ireland project celebrates and shares the history, tradition and heritage of our organisation as well as sustaining it for the future".

The Great Lighthouses of Ireland project is supported by the European Union's INTERRIG IVA cross-border programme, managed by the Special EU Programmes Body (SEUBP).  The ambitious and imaginative cross-border project will include the preservation and conservation of Ireland's important lighthouse and maritime heritage.  Great Lighthouses of Ireland is built on a sustainable economic model and the reinvention of individual lighthouses as visitor attractions and unique self-catering accommodation that can contribute to local communities in terms of visitor spend and tourism employment.

Addressing the audience at the launch, Minister Donohoe TD said:

"Our island's maritime heritage is a source of pride to us all.  This initiative allows us to celebrate and share this with our visitors and with each other.  The Great Lighthouses of Ireland project is a unique and exciting collaboration between many people and organisations, each with different and specialist skills, who have come together to create something exceptional.  I am particularly pleased that this experience has been developed to build on the momentum of the Wild Atlantic Way and to contribute to our new destination brand, Ireland's Ancient East".

The Great Lighthouses of Ireland partners include the Commissioners of Irish Lights; the Irish Landmark Trust; the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds; Forbairt Fhanada Teoranta; Hook Heritage Limited; Clare County Council; Ballycotton Lighthouse Tours; Mid & East Antrim Borough Council; Valentia Island Development Company; and Clare Island Lighthouse.  Great Lighthouses of Ireland is also supported by Fáilte Ireland; Tourism Northern Ireland; and Tourism Ireland.

For further information on Great Lighthouses of Ireland visit: www.greatlighthouses.com

Structures at Risk Fund 2015

Tue, 05 May 2015 13:00:00 IST
Structures at Risk Fund 2015  

Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, has announced that 28 heritage structures from across the country are to benefit from a total of €624,000 in funding under the Structures at Risk Fund 2015.

The funding will allow conservation work to be carried out on 28 heritage structures in both private and public ownership deemed to be at significant risk of deterioration and which are protected under the Planning and Development Act, 2000, as amended.

Minister Humphreys said: "Protecting our built heritage is so important.  The Structures at Risk Fund, which is administered by my Department, provides targeted investment in the most vulnerable aspects of our built heritage.  This fund will help to ensure the survival of some of Ireland's most significant architectural, archaeological, cultural and historic buildings.

"Since 2011, almost 130 structures will have been funded under this scheme.  This year the fund will support a wide range of building types from thatched houses to a school house to a former almshouse.

"Our beautiful old buildings are one of the many reasons that people come to visit this country.  By supporting best practice in the conservation of our protected structures, we are contributing to the attraction of our country as a tourist destination.

"Conservation work on older buildings also contributes to local employment, and I believe the preservation of heritage structures is very important for our pride of place.  I know the funding being provided will make a big difference to the 28 projects involved".

Click here to see the full list of heritage structures that will benefit from funding under the Structures at Risk Fund 2015:  Structures at Risk Fund 2015

Heritage Council Announces Funding for 197 Heritage Projects

Thu, 30 Apr 2015 00:05:00 IST

Heritage Council Community Based Heritage Grant Scheme 2015

The Heritage Council has announced funding for 197 Heritage Projects under its 2015 community-based Heritage Grants Scheme.  The scheme, which supports the continuing conservation and development of Irish heritage through local community-based groups, is expected to generate total investment of more than €1 million.  Funding of €547,000 is being provided through the Heritage Council and the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht.

The scheme has proven to be hugely popular with over 600 applications received.  Examples of the built heritage projects that have received funding include the restoration of the Conacher and Company pipe organ at Saint John’s Church, Cloverhill, County Cavan (€5,000); the preservation of the thatched roof on a house in Legaltan, County Donegal (€4,000); the repairs to the roof and walls of The Priory, Kells, County Kilkenny (€4,000); the conservation of the early seventeenth-century Carstown House, County Louth (€1,300); and the repair of the clock and windows as Saint Coman’s Church, Roscommon, County Roscommon (€3,500).

Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, said: "It is very important that we invest in protecting our heritage.  I am delighted to have been able to support the reintroduction of this Heritage Council Grant Scheme which will result in considerable economic and community development throughout the country.  It directly supports community groups which work tirelessly, often on a voluntary basis, to conserve local heritage projects.  I have a huge appreciation for the pride local communities take in heritage projects, and how these projects can help inspire pride of place and attract visitors.  This funding will come as a great boost to individual projects and communities involved".

Click here to view all of the grants offered in 2015:  Heritage Council Community Based Heritage Grant Scheme 2015

Minister Joe McHugh TD launches NIAH Donegal County Survey and Introduction

Fri, 17 Apr 2015 17:30:00 IST

Donegal Launch 01

Left to right: Dennis Kelly, Senior Executive Planner, Donegal County Council; Seamus Neely, County Manager, Donegal County Council; Councillor John Campbell, Cathaoirleach, Donegal County Council; Joe McHugh TD, Minister of State, Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht; T.J. O'Meara, Architectural Heritage Officer, National Inventory of Architectural Heritage, Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht

Donegal Launch 02‌‌

 

Joe McHugh TD, Minister of State for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, launched the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage Survey of County Donegal at Glenveagh Castle, County Donegal, on Friday 17th April, 2015.  The survey is available on www.buildingsofireland.ie and is accompanied by an illustrated book, An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Donegal, the 32nd to be published in the series.  The survey marks an important milestone in compiling a national inventory of the architectural heritage of Ireland.

Arising from the survey, the Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht has so far recommended to Donegal County Council that 2,228 structures of Architectural Heritage value in the county be included in their Record of Protected Structure.  Minister McHugh remarked that 'the results of the survey will reinforce pride in our built heritage and ensure that it will be cherished for this and for future generations'.

A wide variety of structures has been recorded in Donegal.  Of particular importance is the survival of many thatched buildings and the survey has identified that County Donegal boasts the greatest concentration and variety of vernacular buildings found anywhere in Ireland.  Another highlight of County Donegal is the ecclesiastical architecture of the local architect, the late Liam McCormick, the finest collection of twentieth-century churches in the country.

Minister McHugh emphasised the important role of the survey in assisting Donegal county Council in the future protection of the built heritage of their county.  He added: 'If historic buildings are to survive as our legacy to future generations, they will have to be adapted to cater for the changing needs of their occupants.  The challenge is to manage change without sacrificing the intrinsic character of the building'.

Click here to view the NIAH Donegal County Survey.  Click here for information on the An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Donegal book

First issue of "Heritage Ireland" now available

Mon, 13 Apr 2015 00:05:00 IST

Heritage Ireland's first magazine, "Heritage Ireland", a collaboration between the Office of Public Works and the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, is now available and brings you features and news on Ireland's cultural institutions and heritage sites.

Included in "Heritage Ireland" are short articles by some of the people who care for these sites: the guides who help visitors to enjoy what they have on offer; the archaeologists who have studied their mysteries for years; and the architects who work on their conservation and restoration.

Included in the first issue of "Heritage Ireland" are articles on Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin; the Rock of Cashel, County Tipperary; Charles Fort, Kinsale, County Cork; Rathfarnham Castle, Dublin; Saint Mel's Catholic Cathedral, Longford; and the National Botanic Gardens in Glasnevin.

One of the themes running through "Heritage Ireland" is Ireland during the First World War, such as the storey of the Irish National War Memorial Gardens, dedicated to the memory of those Irish soldiers who died between 1914-1918, as well as the story of the Lusitania on the eve of the anniversary of its sinking 100 years ago.

Click here to download your copy of the first issue of "Heritage Ireland": Heritage Ireland Issue 1 (Spring 2015)

  Heritage Ireland E-zine Spring 2015

Minister Humphreys Launches New Booklets in Built Heritage Advice Series

Tue, 24 Mar 2015 19:00:00 GMT

Thatch Advice Series

Paving Advice Series

 

Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, has launched the latest in her Department's Advice Series, entitled Thatch – A Guide to the Repair of Thatched Roofs and Paving – The Conservation of Historic Ground Surfaces.  These latest publications extend the series to eleven publications in all.

Speaking at the launch, Minister Humphreys commented that "Each of the themes of these two new publications is important in itself but what historic thatch and paving unfortunately share is a vulnerability to loss".  She went on to say "I am aware that thatch, by its very nature, presents particular conservation issues and therefore I have asked my Department to explore what actions are necessary to ensure the continued survival of this important aspect of our vernacular heritage".

The Advice Series publications are intended to give the custodians of historic buildings the knowledge they need to make decisions on the care of their building, and the language they need to ask the right questions of their professional advisors and builders.  The series sets out the Department's standards of best practice in the conservation of the architectural heritage and is also intended for use by architects, engineers and other building professionals as well as builders and craft-workers, including thatchers.

The publication Thatch – A Guide to the Repair of Thatched Roofs will help owners to look at their historic thatched roof in a new light with greater understanding of the extraordinary heritage, skill and craftsmanship of many generations which it embodies.  It is also intended to equip them with the necessary information to identify problems at an early stage and decide how best to tackle them.

The purpose of the second publication, Paving – The Conservation of Historic Ground Surfaces, is to advise the custodians of historic paving, whether private owners, institutions or local authorities, on how to conserve and care for such surfaces and plan for their repair.

Referring to the newly launched publications, Minister Humphreys spoke of a number of schemes funded by her Department and in particular the Structures at Risk fund 2015 where €624,000 was recently made available, stating that "by continuing the scheme this year, it will allow individuals and Local Authorities to take positive action to protect historic buildings and structures in their area".  The Minister added that "our built heritage is an incredibly important asset in terms of tourism and a great source pride and enjoyment for local communities".

The Minister thanked everyone who assisted in producing the publications, including the authors, local authority staff and the staff in her Department, concluding that she hoped "that these guides will be of interest to general readers, including local historians, teachers and all those involved in promoting the understanding of the conservation of these important aspects of built heritage".

Copies of the booklets, and the previous nine publications, are available through the Government Publications Sales Office, good bookshops and online from www.wordwellbooks.com and are priced at €10 each.  The booklets are also free to download here

 

NIAH National Data Download now available

Wed, 25 Feb 2015 00:05:00 GMT

The NIAH National Data Download is now available.  The data is in five parts – Dublin (including Dublin City; Fingal and South Dublin County); Connaught; Leinster; Munster and Ulster – and contains all of the records published by the NIAH indexed by Registration Number.

The data includes the Location; Classification; Rating; Description and Appraisal fields and links to the records and images on the NIAH website: www.buildingsofireland.ie.  The Location information is also available in ITM, Lat&Long and National Grid.

As surveys are published more data will be added to the NIAH National Data Download.

Click here to access the NIAH National Data Download

  NIAH National Data Download

Minister Humphreys announces €624,000 Structures at Risk Fund 2015

Mon, 09 Feb 2015 00:05:00 GMT

Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, has announced funding of €624,000 for the protection and upgrading of heritage buildings under the Structures at Risk Fund 2015.

The Fund is used to safeguard structures in civic and private ownership protected under the Planning and Development Act, 2000, and can also apply to some structures in Architectural Conservation Areas.  Typical works funded under the scheme include roof repairs, structural consolidation and measures to ensure weather tightness.

Minister Humphreys said:

"This scheme encourages the regeneration and reuse of heritage properties and helps to secure the preservation of protected structures which might otherwise be lost.  Since 2011, over 100 structures have been safeguarded for the future as a result of the Structures at Risk Fund scheme.

"Continuing the scheme this year will allow individuals and local authorities to take positive action to protect heritage buildings and structures in their area.  Our built heritage is an incredibly important asset in terms of tourism and for the pride and enjoyment of local communities.

"By continuing to support best practice in the conservation of protected structures, we can preserve our built heritage of future generations and boost our attractiveness as a tourist destination, while also contributing to local employment".

Details of the application process for the Structures at Risk Fund 2015 can be obtained by contacting your local authority.

Minister Humphreys announces End of Year Results for Built Heritage Jobs Leverag

Thu, 01 Jan 2015 00:05:00 GMT

Built Heritage Jobs Leverage Scheme 2014 Year End Results

Clockwise from top left: Saint Sinian's Church (Clonfad), Tyrrellspass, County Westmeath; Saint Canice's Cathedral, Kilkenny, County Kilkenny; Saint Columba's Church (Swords), Swords, County Dublin; Boathouse at Loughshinny Harbour, County Dublin; Thatched House, Toberburr Road, County Dublin; Lock Keeper's Cottage, Boolykeath, County Meath

 

Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, has announced the end of year results for the Built Heritage Jobs Leverage Scheme 2014.  The scheme generated 175 jobs and a total of €15 million was invested in 540 projects across the country.

By making it a condition of the scheme that taxpayer funds were at least matched by private funds, the €5 million supplied by the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht unlocked at least €10 million in private funding for these projects.

Structures funded under the scheme included churches, country houses, thatched houses and townhouses.  While many of the structures were private dwellings or places of worship, a large number of heritage tourism structures were also funded, the works permitting greater public access to heritage buildings or improving educational use through new interpretation of heritage buildings.  More unusual properties also benefitted including follies, market houses, railway structures and workhouses.

Minister Humphreys said:

"Ireland's heritage buildings and protected structures are a vital part of our villages, towns, cities and also the rural landscape.  This scheme has been a cornerstone of investment in built heritage at a local level around the country and has played a key part in the wider reinvestment in core areas of our towns and cities.

"The linkage between conservation works, employment, and the leveraging of private sector investment has been enthusiastically adopted nationally.  The allocation of this funding in 2014 has also reignited private sector investment in heritage buildings, both urban and rural.

"This innovative approach aligned heritage assets with economic growth and shows how historic buildings are not only an intrinsic part of Ireland's heritage, but can also provide a real boost to job creation in the construction, conservation and tourism sectors.  The heritage sector has long argued that heritage conservation supports employment in SMEs, and the results of this scheme demonstrate that this is the case.

"I particularly wish to acknowledge the contribution of the local authorities in embracing this scheme which has had a positive impact on protected structures across the country.  I am also delighted by the response of private owners and their willingness to release substantial private matching funds and invest in our built heritage".

"Architectural Waterford – Buildings Through Time": A new Heritage Guide celebra

Thu, 27 Nov 2014 00:05:00 GMT

Architectural Waterford - Buildings through Time

Architectural Waterford - Buildings through Time Launch

At the launch of ARCHITECTURAL WATERFORD - Buildings through Time in the Medieval Museum, Waterford, were Eamonn McEneaney, Director of Waterford Treasures; Bernadette Guest, Heritage Officer, Waterford City and County Council; Rosemary Ryall, Conservation Officer, Waterford City and County Council; Lar Power, Director of Services, Economic Development, Waterford City and County Council; and Brian White, Director of Services, Planning and Corporate Affairs, Waterford City and County Council

 

ARCHITECTURAL WATERFORD – Buildings through Time, a new heritage tourism guide published by Waterford City and Council's Heritage Office, celebrates the built heritage of County Waterford.  ARCHITECTURAL WATERFORD follows on from the publication of Walk Waterford in 2012 and Historic Waterford – The Coast in 2013 and further guides on cultural heritage and historic houses and gardens are planned for 2015.

Visually appealing and informative, ARCHITECTURAL WATERFORD details sites of architectural interest in Waterford City and in the towns and villages around County Waterford including Ardmore, Ballyduff, Dungarvan, Dunmore East, Lismore, Portlaw and Tramore.  The guide includes details of the many notable architects who worked in the county and left a legacy of fine country houses and ecclesiastical structures.  Highlights include the "John Roberts Square"; the "Pugin Room" in Lismore Castle; and the Harry Clarke windows in many of the county's churches.

Speaking at the launch of the guide in the Medieval Museum, Waterford, Mayor of Waterford City and Council, Councillor James Tobin, said: "Waterford City and County has an architectural heritage that ranges from the Early Christian period through Viking, Anglo-Norman, Medieval, Georgian and Victorian eras to the present day and this succinct guide impresses upon us the broad range of this rich and varied built heritage.  The interest of the public in our built heritage is now well recognised and it is being actively promoted and celebrated though initiatives such as the Waterford Garden Trail.  Built heritage has the potential to be the cornerstone of tourism promotion in the south-east".

Julian Walton, the keynote speaker at the launch, gave an interesting overview of how the built heritage of County Waterford has been recognised over the years through publications such as The Shell Guide to Ireland, An Foras Forbartha, and the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage's An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Waterford.  He welcomed the publication of ARCHITECTURAL WATERFORD which, in a succinct way, highlights the features of architectural interest in the county and the architects and artists responsible for those works.

ARCHITECTURAL WATERFORD was collated by Bernadette Guest, Heritage Officer, and Rosemary Ryall, Conservation Officer, and its publication was made possible with the support of funding from the Heritage Council through the County Heritage Plan Fund 2014.  Ms. Guest commented: "Making architecture and built heritage accessible to the public is key, as recognised in the annual Waterford Festival of Architecture along with events held during Culture Night, Heritage Week and Open House.  All of our buildings have stories to tell and it is important that we share these stories through accessible guides such as this".

Copies of ARCHITECTURAL WATERFORD are available in libraries, museums and tourist offices and by contacting the Heritage Office on 058 208 39/051 849 668 or by e-mail: bguest@waterfordcouncil.ie.  Click on the cover on the left to download a digital copy of ARCHITECTURAL WATERFORD.

An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Donegal now available

Wed, 24 Sep 2014 00:05:00 IST
Donegal Introduction  

The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage has recently published An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Donegal, the thirty-second in a series showcasing the Architectural Heritage of Ireland.

County Donegal has a rich architectural heritage that covers a wide range of structures from churches, country houses and public buildings to farm buildings and vernacular houses.

Eighteenth-century country houses include Buncrana Castle (1718) on Inishowen, a rigidly symmetrical house with projecting corner flankers recalling earlier defensive structures, and Wardstown Castle (1739-40), distinguished by its graceful bowed projections.  Nineteenth-century country houses including the Elizabethan-style Lough Eske Castle (1859-61) and the neo-medieval Glenveagh Castle (1867-73).  County Donegal boasts a wealth of vernacular houses with most conforming to a local pattern comprising a direct entry plan with central doorway, gable-ended chimney stacks, and pitched thatched roofs secured with ropes tied onto timber pegs.

Lifford and Raphoe are examples of towns laid out in the course of the seventeenth-century Plantation of Ulster and both feature an array of public buildings including Lifford Courthouse (1746) and the Old Royal School (1737) in Raphoe.  The most important public buildings, however, are found in Ballyshannon and Letterkenny and include the former Belfast Bank (1878) in Ballyshannon and Saint Conal's Psychiatric Hospital (1902-4), Letterkenny.

A maritime county, Donegal also has a rich built heritage relating to the coast including coastguard stations, lighthouses and piers: Napoleonic signal towers that dot the coastline and batteries and forts along the shores of Loughs Foyle and Swilly are evidence of the county's strategic importance.

County Donegal's legacy of ecclesiastical architecture is also noteworthy and includes eighteenth-century Church of Ireland and Presbyterian churches; pre-Emancipation Catholic chapels; nineteenth-century Methodist churches; the Byzantine Romanesque basilica (1821-31) on Station Island, Lough Derg; and the striking churches designed by Liam McCormick (1916-96).

An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Donegal, featuring a text by Duncan McLaren and T.J. O'Meara, is now available in good bookshops and online at www.wordwellbooks.com

Minister Humphreys announces €54,500 in Conservation Funding for Heritage Buildi

Mon, 22 Sep 2014 00:05:00 IST

Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, announced on Friday 19th September, 2014, a total of €54,500 in funding for urgent conservation works at Vernon Mount, Cork; the College Garden Boundary Wall at Saint Mary's College, Youghal, County Cork; and at Ballysampson House in County Wexford.

Minister Humphreys said: "Vernon Mount, Saint Mary's College and Ballysampson House are heritage buildings of significant importance.  I am delighted to be able to support urgent conservation works to these structures.  Our national built heritage is a valuable asset which, as well as enriching out environment, generates considerable economic activity in tourism, construction and related industries".

Vernon Mount is a late eighteenth-century villa of special interest.  A grant of €22,500 is being provided by the Minister to Cork County Council, which will allow for conservation works to be carried out to prevent the structure of this historic building from further deterioration.

The College Garden Boundary Wall at Saint Mary's College, Youghal, dating from the early seventeenth century, is part of an important protected structure and recorded monument.  It forms part of the boundary of the medieval walled gardens of Saint Mary's College, which was created by royal charter in 1464 over a hundred years prior to Trinity College, Dublin.  The wall, which borders a public road and which is currently cordoned off by Cork County Council, requires emergency stabilisation work.  A sum of €20,000 allocated by the Minister will help to fund the most urgent of the repairs required.

Ballysampson House is an eighteenth-century farmhouse given as the birthplace of Commodore John Barry (1745-1803), "Father of the American Navy", whose statue stands on Crescent Quay, Wexford.  An allocation of €12,000 to Wexford County Council has been approved to fund urgent repair works to safeguard the house.
 

Vernon Mount, Cork, County Cork

Ballysampson House, BALLYSAMPSON Td., County Wexford

TOP: Vernon Mount, Cork, County Cork; BOTTOM: Ballysampson House, BALLYSAMPSON Td., County Wexford

Minister Deenihan announces allocation to fund Conservation Works to Heritage

Mon, 16 Jun 2014 00:05:00 IST
Heritage Structures in State Care Fund  

Jimmy Deenihan TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, today (16th June 2014) announced the allocation of €347,200 to five local authorities for urgent conservation and preservation works to five heritage structures of national significance.

This allocation will assist with works to safeguard a number of important buildings and monuments protected under the Planning and Development Act or under the National Monuments Acts.

Minister Deenihan said:

I am delighted to be able to support urgently needed conservation works to these highly important structures.  Our national built heritage is a valuable asset which, as well as enriching our environment, generates considerable economic activity in tourism, construction and related industries.

The amounts recommended are between €60,000 and €80,000.  The list of heritage structures funded is as follows:

Cork County Council - Saint Mary's Collegiate Church, Youghal (€60,000)

Kerry County Council - Ballybunion Castle (€80,000)

Kildare County Council - Grey Abbey, Kildare (€66,695)

Waterford City Council - 4&5 Cathedral Square, Waterford (€67,735)

Wexford County Council - Crimean Monument, Ferrycarrig (€72,500)

NIAH Dublin City Survey Phases 1 and 2 now online

Wed, 21 May 2014 00:05:00 IST
NIAH Dublin City Survey Showcase  

Phases 1 and 2 of the NIAH Dublin City Survey are now online.  Phase 1 covers the postal area of Dublin 1 while Phase 2 covers the postal area of Dublin 7.  The NIAH Dublin City Survey is being carried out in phases and the fieldwork for phases 1 and 2 was carried out in 2011 and 2012.

Among the architectural highlights covered in Phases 1 and 2 are the James Gandon (1742-83)-designed Custom House (1781-91) and Four Courts (1785-1802), both of which have been given an International Rating Value.  The National Museum of Ireland at the eighteenth-century Collins Barracks, assigned a National Rating Value, is one of the many sites included in the survey which are open to the public.  Also open to the public are the GPO (1808) in O'Connell Street and Busáras (1946-53) on the corner of Store Street and Beresford Place, an icon of twentieth-century architecture in Ireland and one that has been given an International Rating Value.

Click here to view the NIAH Dublin City Survey

Minister Deenihan Announces Allocations from Built Heritage Jobs Leverage Scheme

Tue, 01 Apr 2014 00:05:00 IST
Built Heritage Jobs Leverage Scheme 2014 Project Approval  

Jimmy Deenihan TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, has approved funding in principle for 618 projects at protected structures across the State.  These projects, with a combined value of €21 million, of which €5 million is from the taxpayer, are being progressed under the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht Built Heritage Jobs Leverage Scheme 2014.

These projects will allow for a range of important conservation works to take place at protected structures in all parts of Ireland, and will generate and support significant employment in the conservation and construction industries and in specialist trades.

By making it a condition of the scheme that taxpayer funds will at least be matched by private funding, initial figures provided to the Department indicate that the €5 million Built Heritage Jobs Leverage Scheme 2014 will unlock €16 million in private funding for these projects.

Of the 618 structures approved, the majority are nineteenth-century houses – ranging from farmhouses to glebe houses, suburban villas to townhouses – followed by churches and country houses.  The conservation and repair of a large number of thatched structures will also be funded.  The main type of work to be funded is roof repairs such are renewing/replacing slate, lead work, flashing or timbers.

While many of the structures are either private domestic dwellings or places of worship, a large number of commercial and heritage/tourism structures are also included.  Some notable structures that have also been approved in principle for funding include Saint Colman's Cathedral, Cobh, County Cork – a building rated by the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage as being of International importance – Birr Castle, County Offaly, and Russborough House, County Wicklow.

Local authorities, to whom the responsibility for administration of the scheme has been devolved, have assessed applications from owners/occupiers of protected structures and then submitted them from approval in principle by the Minister.  All successful applicants must comply with the terms and conditions of the scheme in order to draw down funding.

Minister Deenihan commented:

Ireland's heritage buildings and protected structures are a vital part of our villages, towns, cities and also the rural landscape.  They help make Ireland look like Ireland.  They tell a story about our past.  And they are also homes, businesses and places where communities gather together.

With thousands of people living and working in heritage buildings, I am delighted to announce the allocations from this scheme.  This scheme is the most significant investment in protected structures since 2008, and has unlocked more than three times its value from the private sector.

This innovative approach is aligning heritage assets with economic growth and shows how historic buildings are not only an intrinsic part of Ireland's heritage, but also can provide real benefit in job creation and to the construction, conservation and tourism sector.

Nationally more than 600 projects are being provisionally approved.  Funding allocations have been made with reference to both population size and the number of protected structures in each local authority area.  Download a county-by-county breakdown of the number of projects approved here: Built Heritage Jobs Leverage Scheme 2014 Project Approval

Places to See in County Mayo now online

Tue, 17 Dec 2013 00:05:00 GMT

Are you planning a day out or a weekend away in County Mayo?  A selection of sites of Architectural Heritage interest open to the public is now available on the Places to See page.  Some sites will have an entry fee.  Check opening arrangements before you set out.  If you would like your site included on the Places to See page please contact the NIAH at: niah@ahg.gov.ie

  Places to See in County Mayo

An Taoiseach Enda Kenny TD launches NIAH Mayo County Survey and Introduction

Mon, 16 Dec 2013 15:00:00 GMT

Mayo Launch

An Taoiseach Enda Kenny TD and Councillor John O'Malley, Cathaoirleach of County Mayo, at the launch of the NIAH Mayo County Survey and Introduction at Turlough Park.  Also attending the launch were Transition Year Students from Saint Joseph's Secondary School, Castlebar, and pictured are (left to right) Sophie Langan, Emily Jennings, Tanya Tolan and Shauna Garvey with their teacher Ms. Marian Harrington

 

An Taoiseach Enda Kenny TD today (Monday 16th December 2013) launched the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage Mayo County Survey at the National Museum of Ireland – Country Life, Turlough Park, County Mayo.  The Mayo County Survey is available online on the NIAH website and is accompanied by an illustrated book, An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Mayo.  The book is the thirty-first to be published in the series and marks an important milestone in compiling the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

Arising from the survey Mr. Jimmy Deenihan TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, recommended 1,470 structures of architectural heritage value be included in County Mayo's Record of Protected Structures.

The survey includes a broad cross-section of the County Mayo's architectural heritage including bridges, churches, courthouses and market houses, estate houses and gate lodges, lighthouses, thatched houses, linen halls and mills, follies and monuments.

Commenting on the survey and Introduction, An Taoiseach remarked:

The important point is that everything of interest – even the county's post boxes – has come under scrutiny, lest their value be overlooked and lost to future generations.

An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Mayo now available

Mon, 16 Dec 2013 00:05:00 GMT
Mayo Introduction‌   

The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage has recently published An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Mayo, the thirty-first in a series showcasing the Architectural Heritage of Ireland.

Among the ecclesiastical highlights illustrated in the Introduction are Saint Mary's Catholic Church in Ballinrobe and Saint Patrick's Catholic Church in Newport which, beyond their architectural importance, are noted for their fine stained glass by Harry Clarke (1889-1931) of Dublin.  Also showcased is the nineteenth-century Holy Trinity Church in Westport which boasts one of the finest interiors in County Mayo.

Westport House, a country house designed by Richard Castle (d. 1751), is a highlight of the eighteenth-century architectural heritage of County Mayo.  The "new town" of Westport, designed by Peter Browne (1731-80) in collaboration with William Leeson (d. c.1805), also features in the Introduction.

As a coastal county, County Mayo boasts a wealth of harbours and piers designed by Alexander Nimmo (1783-1832) and lighthouses by George Halpin Senior (1776-1854) and his son George Halpin Junior (1804-69).  The role played by Blacksod Point Lighthouse in the D-Day Landings is also remembered.

Monuments commemorating events and individuals, both private and public, are well illustrated and include an early nineteenth-century obelisk erected by a landlord to the memory of his wife; the Gothic Revival fantasy that is the Knox-Gore Monument outside Ballina; and an array of 1798 Monuments across the county.

An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Mayo is now available in good bookshops and online at www.wordwellbooks.com

NIAH Mayo County Survey now online

Fri, 13 Dec 2013 00:05:00 GMT

 

The NIAH Mayo County Survey is now online.  County Mayo boasts a rich architectural heritage dating back to the early eighteenth century.  The diversity of religious persuasion is well represented and includes the late eighteenth-century Castlebar Methodist Chapel (1785); the early nineteenth-century Mullafarry Presbyterian Church (1824-6); the Gothic Revival Saint Muredach's Catholic Cathedral (1827-37), Ballina; the cathedral-like Saint Patrick's Catholic Church (1914-8), Newport; and the late nineteenth-century Holy Trinity Church (1869-71), Westport, which boasts one of the finest interiors in County Mayo.  The coastline features a wide variety of building types including harbours and piers designed by Alexander Nimmo (1783-1832); lighthouses by George Halpin Senior (1776-1854) and George Halpin Junior (1804-69); signal towers erected during the Napoleonic Wars (1803-15); and lookout posts marking the efforts by the Irish Government to protect its neutrality during "The Emergency" (1939-46).  All aspects of the architectural heritage of County Mayo have been recorded ranging from the grandest of country houses to the cast-iron post boxes and waterpumps that make a significant contribution to the historic streetscape.  Click here to view the NIAH Mayo County Survey

   NIAH Mayo County Survey Showcase

Minister Deenihan launches NIAH Cavan and Monaghan County Surveys

Thu, 05 Dec 2013 17:30:00 GMT

Jimmy Deenihan, TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, today (Thursday 5th December, 2013) launched the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage Surveys of Counties Cavan and Monaghan in Castlesaunderson Church, County Cavan, and at the Market House, Monaghan Town, respectively.  The Cavan County Survey and the Monaghan County Survey are available online on the NIAH website and are accompanied by illustrated books, An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Cavan and An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Monaghan.  These are the 29th and 30th books to be published in the series and mark an important milestone in compiling the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage.

Arising from the surveys, the Minister has recommended that 770 structures of architectural heritage value in County Cavan and 1,257 structures in County Monaghan be included in each county's Record of Protected Structures.

Minister Deenihan remarked:

The results of the surveys will reinforce pride in our built heritage and ensure that it will be cherished for this and for future generations.

 

Cavan Launch

Jimmy Deenihan TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, presents Val Smith, Cathaoirleach, Cavan County Council, with a copy of An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Cavan

Monaghan Launch

Left to right: Natalie de Roiste, Built Heritage Collective; Willy Cumming, Senior Architectural Advisor, NIAH; Barry O'Reilly, Architectural Heritage Officer, NIAH; Jimmy Deenihan TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht; Mary O'Reilly, Shannon Images; Kevin V. Mulligan, author of An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Monaghan

 

Each county boasts a wealth of architectural heritage dating from the medieval period up to the present day.  The surveys, which cover an array of civic, commercial, industrial, religious and residential buildings, will significantly contribute to our understanding of the history and development of Cavan and Monaghan.  Their rich architectural legacies include imposing country houses, impressive public buildings, fine railway stations, and simple cast-iron posts boxes and waterpumps.

The Minister added:

If historic buildings are to survive as our legacy to future generations, they will have to be adapted to cater for the changing circumstances and needs of their present owners and users.  The challenge is to manage change without sacrificing the intrinsic character of the building.

Minister Deenihan emphasised the important role the surveys play in assisting Cavan and Monaghan County Councils in the future protection of the built heritage of their counties.

NIAH Monaghan County Survey now online

Tue, 05 Nov 2013 00:05:00 GMT
 NIAH Monaghan County Survey Showcase  

County Monaghan enjoys a rich architectural legacy dating back to the early eighteenth century and in the course of the survey a wide variety of buildings types was identified and recorded.  Significant country houses include the late eighteenth-century Anketell Grove and the nineteenth-century Bessmount Park and Castle Leslie.  Religious diversity is remembered by churches, both large and small, belonging to the Catholic, Church of Ireland, Methodist and Presbyterian communities.  Noble courthouses occupy prominent positions in Carrickmacross and Monaghan while the market towns of Ballybay and Clones boast Classical market houses.  The abandoned Ulster Canal has left its imprint on the landscape and numerous bridges, locks and lockkeepers' houses survive.  County Monaghan also features a unique collection of corrugated-iron buildings, the material appearing on churches, halls and houses.  Click here to view the NIAH Monaghan County Survey

Places to See in County Cavan now online

Wed, 02 Oct 2013 09:00:00 IST

Are you planning a day out or a weekend away in County Cavan?  A selection of sites of Architectural Heritage interest open to the public is now available on the Places to See page.  Some sites will have an entry fee.  Check opening arrangements before you set out.  If you would like your site included on the Places to See page please contact the NIAH at: niah@ahg.gov.ie

  Places to See in County Cavan

An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Cavan now available

Fri, 27 Sep 2013 00:00:00 IST
Cavan Introduction  

The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage has recently published An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Cavan, the thirtieth in a series showcasing the Architectural Heritage of Ireland.

Among the country houses showcased in the Introduction are the early eighteenth-century Bellamont, near Cootehill, a neo-Palladian country house designed by Sir Edward Lovett Pearce (d. 1733); and Castle Saunderson, a late eighteenth-century house remodelled in the nineteenth century as a picturesque Gothic Revival "castle".

The diversity of religious persuasion is well represented and includes the early eighteenth-century Drumloman Church (1739); Corglass Presbyterian Church (1795); and the eye-catching Catholic Cathedral of Saints Patrick and Felim (1939-42), an architectural tour de force.

County Cavan boasts an array of shopfronts, primarily in the Classical style, including the early Medical Hall in Main Street, Bailieborough; Art Deco-like lettering and Celtic Revival motifs add interest to shopfronts in Mullagh and Kilnaleck respectively.  Significant civic structures include the Classical Cavan Courthouse (1824) and the nearby Cavan Town Hall (1909) by William Alphonsus Scott (1871-1921), an Arts-and-Crafts masterpiece showing the influence of the English designer William Morris.

An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Cavan, featuring a text by Kevin V. Mulligan, is now available in good bookshops and online at www.wordwellbooks.com

An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Monaghan now available

Wed, 04 Sep 2013 01:00:00 IST
Monaghan Introduction  

The National Inventory of Architectural Heritage has recently published An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Monaghan, the twenty-ninth in a series showcasing the Architectural Heritage of Ireland.

Among the highlights illustrated in the Introduction are the eighteenth-century Anketell Grove (1781) and the nineteenth-century Bessmont Park (1868-9), a late Georgian house transformed into a Gothic extravaganza.  The wealth of ecclesiastical architecture in County Monaghan is well represented and includes Saint Sillian's Church (1787; 1827), Templetate; the First Presbyterian Church (1786) at Derryvally; Rockfort Methodist Church (1807); Saint Macartan's Cathedral (1861-92) in Monaghan; and the Le Corbusier-like Church of Our Mother of Mercy (1974), Inishkeen.

County Monaghan's commercial affluence is remembered by Ballybay Market House (1848) and the wealth of banks in each town while important civic structures include Carrickmacross Courthouse (1837) and Carrickmacross Union Workhouse (1841), a sober reminder of the Great Famine.  Transport and industry is represented by the impressive Monaghan Railway Station (1862) and the forges and lime kilns that dot the rural landscape.

An Introduction to the Architectural Heritage of County Monaghan, featuring a text by Kevin V. Mulligan, is now available in good bookshops and online at www.wordwellbooks.com

NIAH Cavan County Survey now online

Tue, 25 Jun 2013 14:57:00 IST

The NIAH Cavan County Survey is now online.  County Cavan boasts a wealth of sites of architectural heritage importance dating from the start of the eighteenth century up to the present day.  In the course of the survey a wide variety of building types was identified and recorded.  The county is notable for the quality of its ecclesiastical heritage and highlights include the twentieth-century cathedral in Cavan town; and the earlier Gothic Revival cathedral at Kilmore.  Many small-scale Catholic, Church of Ireland, Methodist and Presbyterian churches form central elements of the towns and villages in the county and dot the rural landscape, marking the religious diversity that is characteristic of Cavan.  The country house has played an important role in the area and Bellamont and Rathkenny are among the finest houses not only in the county but also in the country.  On the opposite scale the county boasts a notable vernacular heritage with several thatched buildings surviving in the countryside.  Click here to view the NIAH Cavan County Survey

  NIAH Cavan County Survey Showcase 

Structures at Risk Fund 2013

Fri, 24 May 2013 12:00:00 IST

Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Jimmy Deenihan TD, today (Friday, 24th May), announced the awarding of grant funding to thirty-four local authorities under the Department's Structures at Risk Fund 2013.

This funding is allocated to enable conservation works to forty-five heritage structures in both private and public ownership deemed to be at significant risk of deterioration and which are protected under the Planning and Development Acts 2000-2012.

Minister Deenihan commented:

"I am pleased to announce this funding to help support owners and occupiers of protected structures again in 2013 through my Department's Structures at Risk Fund.  Whilst the funding for built heritage is severely limited due to current budgetary constraints, the Structures at Risk Fund is a targeted investment in the most vulnerable aspects of our built heritage and will support some of Ireland's most significant architectural, cultural, archaeological and historic buildings".

This scheme, which has been in operation since 2011, has encouraged regeneration and reuse of heritage properties and helped to secure the preservation of protected structures which may otherwise have been lost. Including the properties to be supported in 2013 announced today, since the introduction of the scheme over 115 structures have secured funding.

Structures at Risk Fund 2013

  Structures at Risk Fund 2013

 

Third Stage of NIAH Donegal County Survey now online

Mon, 15 Apr 2013 12:00:00 IST

The third stage of the NIAH Donegal County Survey is now online and covers the Inishowen Electoral Area.  The survey was carried out in 2008-9 and is the third stage of the survey to be published following on from the Donegal Town and Stranorlar Electoral Areas.  Further stages will be published throughout 2013.  Click here to open the NIAH Donegal County Survey

 

NIAH Donegal County Survey Showcase 

Minister Deenihan launches Shaping the Future

Fri, 14 Dec 2012 10:15:00 GMT

Jimmy Deenihan TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, officially launched his Department's new publication Shaping the Future – Case Studies in Adaptation and Reuse in Historic Urban Environments on Thursday 13th December, 2012.  The purpose of the publication is to show, via case studies, selected examples of what has been happening in recent years in Ireland in terms of the reuse of historic buildings.  The study is not intended to be exhaustive nor is it intended to say that solutions which may suit a particular case are universally applicable.  Each case is different and they are presented as contributions to the debate, describing the aims and objective of the parties involved.  The publication sets out to inform planning authorities, developers and designers that evidence-based quality principles will ensure that future planning of our historic cities, towns and villages is focused on the creation of vibrant, quality places.  Shaping the Future can be downloaded here.

  Shaping the Future 03 

The NIAH at the National Ploughing Championships

Fri, 28 Sep 2012 05:49:00 IST

 

Jimmy Deenihan TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, today (Wednesday 26th September, 2012) launched the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage (NIAH) Places to See website.  The website highlights heritage buildings that are open to the public but are not so well known.

The new website was activated by the Minister while he was visiting his Department's stand at the National Ploughing Championships in New Ross, County Wexford.  The website features an easy-to-use map and drop-down menu providing details of what the visitor can expect to find on arrival at each site.

The Minister said that he welcomed the new website which he hoped 'would encourage a wider interest in lesser-known heritage buildings, many of which are equally as important as our landmark attractions in architectural terms'.  He said that the new website aimed 'to highlight these hidden gems and illustrate the depth and breadth of Ireland's heritage to potential visitors from home and abroad'.

Click here to visit the NIAH Places to See website

  NIAH Places to See Website